Question 1 (multiple choice worth 3 points) (02.04 lc) powers

Question 1 (Multiple Choice Worth 3 points)

(02.04 LC)

Powers shared by the national and state governments are called

implied powers

delegated powers

reserved powers

concurrent powers

Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 3 points)

(02.04 LC)

Expressed powers are

granted to the national government by the U.S. Constitution

granted to state governments by the U.S. Constitution

also referred to as concurrent powers

also referred to as reserved powers

Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 3 points)

(02.04 LC)

Reserved powers are

granted to the national government by the U.S. Constitution

granted to state governments by the U.S. Constitution

not given to the national government and are retained for state governments

not given to the state governments and are retained for the national government

Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

People who take a “marble cake” view of federalism believe that

state governments are too weak to meet most citizen needs

state governments are supreme over the national government

national and state governments cooperate to meet citizen needs

national government should entirely control the state governments

Question 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

The first three articles of the U.S. Constitution

explain the powers delegated to the national government

list the powers implied as belonging to national government

explain the powers reserved to the state governments

list the powers concurrent to the state governments

Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

People who take a “layer cake” view of federalism believe that

state governments are too weak to meet most citizen needs

state governments are supreme over the national government

national and state governments must cooperate to meet citizen needs

national and state governments are exclusively sovereign in their areas

Question 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

Which of the following is an example of a delegated power?

state government passes a tax to pay for highway maintenance

state government orders the local governments to enforce a law

national government creates an air force division of the military

national government passes a law that lowers rates of taxation

Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

Article Four of the U.S. Constitution

explains the powers delegated to the national government

lists the powers implied as belonging to national government

explains the powers reserved to the state governments

lists the powers concurrent to the state governments

Question 9 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

A criticism of the American system of federalism is that it is

unresponsive when it is faced with a dangerous emergency situation

excellent at dealing with emergencies yet inadequate in daily matters

inefficient in responding to crises involving multiple levels of government

too expensive to maintain as a basic principle in the national government

Question 10 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

Which of the following is an example of an implied power?

state government passes a tax to pay for highway maintenance

state government orders the local governments to enforce a law

national government creates an air force division of the military

national government passes a law that lowers rates of taxation

Question 11 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points)

(02.04 MC)

The Tenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution

reserves to the states any powers not delegated to the national government

reserves to the national government any powers not delegated to the states

implies that certain powers are the responsibility of the national government

implies that certain powers are the responsibility of the state governments

Question 12 (Essay Worth 9 points)

(02.04 HC)

In at least two well-written paragraphs, explain the significance of one of the cases below and describe how the case relates to federalism.

Culloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden, or District of Columbia v. Heller